Is your professor really the flaming liberal you think she is?

That colleges and universities are bastions of liberalism is a common assertion and among conservatives, there is considerable resentment about this. But is it true? Over at History News Network, Richard Morris, historian at Lycoming College (emeritus), has recently written a piece in which he consider this question as it relates to faculty members. He argues that …

Continue reading Is your professor really the flaming liberal you think she is?

Gendered Messaging in the Evangelical Purity Movement: My guest post at the Anxious Bench

I've been a fan of the Anxious Bench for years so I'm excited to have this piece picked up by the editors there. The topic is outside the usual cluster of themes I write about here and I may be overextending myself. But consider it a conversation starter if nothing else. Basically, I use my …

Continue reading Gendered Messaging in the Evangelical Purity Movement: My guest post at the Anxious Bench

David Cramer brings “Anabaptist Revisions” to the Patheos Blogosphere

I can't think of a better person to blog about Anabaptist issues than David Cramer. I first got to know David when we worked together on editing a collection of essays about the complicated historical and theological intersection of Anabaptists and evangelicals (The Activist Impulse, 2014). Since that time, David has gone on to earn …

Continue reading David Cramer brings “Anabaptist Revisions” to the Patheos Blogosphere

Evangelicals, Anabaptists, Depression, and Christian Rock: The Hermeneutic Circle’s Top Ten posts of 2018

This past July I dusted off the Hermeneutic Circle and vowed to get back into blogging -- at least once a week. So how did I do? Well, things certainly dwindled off here at the end of the year. So I guess I know what my New Year's resolution will be! But even with the …

Continue reading Evangelicals, Anabaptists, Depression, and Christian Rock: The Hermeneutic Circle’s Top Ten posts of 2018

An obscure book about Greenland and Missions Historiography

I doubt you’ve heard of David Cranz’s two volume History of Greenland, first published in German in 1765. But its obscurity may be masking its significant for understanding early 19th century interest in Protestant missions. Cranz was an important Moravian historian who traveled to Greenland to chronicle the story of the Moravian mission, which had …

Continue reading An obscure book about Greenland and Missions Historiography

Nationalism and the Radical Roots of Opposition to the United Nations

Hearing Donald Trump’s proud self-identification as a nationalist turned my thoughts to his words at the UN earlier this year as well as to the way his America First rhetoric intersects with the content of one of my classes this semester. So I decided to revisit the topic of (radical) conservative opposition to the UN …

Continue reading Nationalism and the Radical Roots of Opposition to the United Nations